Rarely Seen Shark Winds Up At Zoo.
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    For those of you who have not heard/seen this story yet, it is simply amazing.

    The picture above features a frilled shark, rarely seen alive because its natural habitat is 600 metres or more under the sea, is seen in this photo released by the Awashima Marine Park in Numazu, south of Tokyo January 24, 2007. (Reuters)
    There are so many things about this that just make you think, ya know?

    Like:

    - This animal is considered a dinosaur because it's probably been around longer than us, and is so rare that we barely know anything about it.

    - Who was crazy enough to get in the water to take a picture of a shark that hasn't seen a human in it's entire lifetime? I mean, how did this guy know that the shark wouldn't panic and attack immediately?

    - What the heck else is hiding thousand of feet below the water? I am so scared to get in the ocean as it is, now I've got to worry about sea Monsters!

    I just thought this picture/news story was amazing. What an ugly and frightening-looking creature, yes, but what an amazing thing to consider. We have barely "scratched the surface" of the animal kingdom. There is so much more to discover out there somewhere.
  • I will swear that I woke up with one of those one morning when I was in my late teens..... :o

    I do agree with you on not knowing whats in the sea? why are we spending fortunes to get into space when we havent a clue what lies beneith the waves.
  • Rory K STAFF said:
    I will swear that I woke up with one of those one morning when I was in my late teens..... :o

    I do agree with you on not knowing whats in the sea? why are we spending fortunes to get into space when we havent a clue what lies beneith the waves.


    I won't comment on your first line there... umm, so let me move on to the other thing you said...

    I saw another news story this week about our "Mars Rover" that has been up there for 3 years, taking pictures. But really, we haven't seen anything amazing come out of that have we? I certainly haven't seen any aliens yet. Researchers should spend money on the deepest oceans and the darkest caves, that's what I'm interested in. ;)
  • Mcw and Rory, you're both 100% correct as far as exploring the ocean. But here's the problem and possibly the reason WHY (what I've heard at least) we're not looking for new animals under the sea.

    Water pressure.

    The water pressure underneath the sea is so great that it could crush a machine to the size of a marble if it wishes. Not exactly fit conditions for researching. I know that they are in the works of making something durable enough to withstand water pressure, but as of right now..it's come up on empty.
  • Melinda S STAFF said:
    Mcw and Rory, you're both 100% correct as far as exploring the ocean. But here's the problem and possibly the reason WHY (what I've heard at least) we're not looking for new animals under the sea.

    Water pressure.

    The water pressure underneath the sea is so great that it could crush a machine to the size of a marble if it wishes. Not exactly fit conditions for researching. I know that they are in the works of making something durable enough to withstand water pressure, but as of right now..it's come up on empty.



    If it is water pressure that keeps us out, why isn't in crushing plants and animals?? or Spongebob??, How do we explore the remains of the Titanic??
  • It's a very simple and complicated answer. But since you ask..

    Sea animals have adapted to living in the sea. Including the pressure that comes along with it. It's as if we were to be taken to the Himilayas from our current location. There is such low pressure there that it becomes hard for those who aren't adapted to it hard to manage. For those who have adapted to it though, they have no problem moving around.
  • You sure know your stuff Mel.

    I was going to mention the whole "we know more about space than we do about our own plantes oceans" but someone already beat me to it :(
    As for the whole plants/animals thing. Like Mel said, it's the environment of those animals/plants, so they've evolved over millenias to the point where it doesn't affect them. One of the, if not THE, most amazing creatures are Whales. They can dive to depths of hundreds of feet, yet they need to come to the surface to breathe. They can hold their breath for like hours I think. Imagine a human trying to hold their breath for like two or more hours :o
  • Just so you know, when the world comes to "end" my mankind's hand the dolphins will take over!

    You just wait & see, cleaver little buggers they are!
  • No no no no nooooo Chris, the dolphins are such clever little buggers, they'll be long gone before the end, leaving us with a catchy little song.. and I think you know what it will be! :D

    That shark photo is absolutely amazing!!!!!!!!! It's mind-boggling to contemplate what else is going on under all that water that we have absolutely no idea about. I know there must be tons and tons more. (like, if there were no sponges in there, how much more water would our oceans have? :confused: )